Peace First at the Horseshoe Table

Germany brings diplomatic weight to the UN Security Council, to which it was elected on 8th June. The German government should use this advantage to support mediation and peace processes as priorities of its two-year membership. It should focus on three central instruments in this regard: refining sanctions, accountability of troop contributing countries, as well as the organization of more flexible visiting missions by Security Council diplomats.

Advertisements

This text was first published on the PeaceLab Blog. It is also available in German.

764925 German FM Maas after election to UNSC 2018.jpg
German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas at UN Headquarters after Germany’s election to the UN Security Council for 2019/2020, 8 June 2018 (c) UN Photo.

Every eight years, Germany joins the playing field of major powers at the United Nations. Newly elected members to the UN Security Council like Germany have to prove themselves vis-à-vis the five permanent members every time anew. In the midst of political quarrels about the use of chemical weapons in Syria and the daily management of peace operations, the attention on the core purpose of the Council, to maintain international peace and security, gets lost all too easily. Germany should thus strive to strengthen peace processes and mediation efforts through the Security Council.

Germany is an unusually resourceful non-permanent member

Non-permanent members of the Security Council only have limited influence. The veto power of China, France, Russia, the UK, and the USA is not the only reason for that. Those countries also possess continuous experience in the negotiations, issues, and countries that shape the Council’s agenda. In this game of major powers, smaller members might at most be able to build bridges, improve working methods, or make small substantial suggestions.

As fourth largest financial contributor to the UN’s regular budget and, despite deficits, an important actor on the diplomatic floor, Germany needs to aim higher. In a number of countries on the Security Council’s agenda, German diplomats already play a substantial role. In those cases, the German government should use its membership in the Council as an additional diplomatic forum, whose approaches and instruments have their own benefits. Together with its European partners Germany can, for example, promote the maintenance of the nuclear agreement with Iran, demand humanitarian access and accountability for war crimes in Syria, prepare a peace operation in Ukraine, support the negotiations with the Taliban in Afghanistan, and shape the reconstruction of liberated areas in Iraq. Germany already has a leading position in all these contexts due to its existing channels and contacts – this should be reflected in the Security Council.

Peace operations need to be guided by a political strategy

Reaching consensus among its members on the overarching political objectives that should guide its crisis management is probably the biggest challenge for the Security Council. The High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) already demanded in its seminal 2015 report that peace operations should always follow a political strategy. Otherwise they run the risk of being driven by military considerations, and of falling prey to the diverging interests of the conflict parties. In fragile contexts such as Mali, the Democratic Republic of Congo or South Sudan, there are incessant threats to the civilian population that can justify international protection measures, as the former UN staff member Ralph Mamiya observes. Yet without a political process, there can be no structuring priorities that could guide the strategic deployment of scarce resources and a foreseeable withdrawal of international troops.

Naturally, there are manifest reasons for the lack of political strategies in the UN Security Council. For one thing, these are genuinely difficult questions without obvious and easy solutions. Moreover, the work of the Council relies on hard-fought compromises, which result in frequently vague or complicated language. Furthermore, in some situations, such as in South Sudan, there is no functioning peace agreement that could guide the actions of a peace operation.

Germany should encourage strategic thinking in the Security Council

Germany cannot remove these structural deficits in two years. Neither does it have the diplomatic capacities to work out a strategy for each situation on the Security Council’s agenda . The German government thus needs to set clear priorities. German diplomats can encourage the Security Council to think more strategically. The more interactive and informal the discussions before the proper negotiations are, the more fruitful the latter  are in many cases.

The German government could take its cue from Sweden, which, together with Peru, organized a retreat for all ambassadors in the Security Council this year. The Permanent Mission in New York can also organize events at the sidelines of official meetings and informal briefings in line with the Arria formula. This would bring the perspectives of civil society organizations of affected countries as well as experts on current mediation and negotiation processes to Manhattan. Lastly, Germany could organize a thematic debate on the contribution of the whole UN system to peace processes during one of its two monthly presidencies of the Security Council. This debate should address the limitations of the Security Council head on and tackle its cooperation with other UN entities such as special envoys, special rapporteurs, and the UN Development Program.

Using clear listing criteria for targeted sanctions

The improvement of the Council’s working atmosphere and quality of discussion aside, Germany should focus its “peace first” attention on three core instruments of the Security Council: refining targeted sanctions, the accountability of troop contributing countries, as well as the organization of more flexible visiting missions by Security Council diplomats.

The Security Council maintains 14 sanctions regimes, some of which explicitly aim to support peace and transition processes, for example in South Sudan, Mali, or Libya. Theoretically, such sanctions should not primarily punish individuals, but incentivize them to participate in peace processes in a constructive manner through travel bans and asset freezes. In reality, the restraints of those sanctions are often too slow and too backwards-oriented to actually influence mediation efforts substantially. Germany has contributed to the reform of UN sanctions since the late 1990s. As a member of the sanctions committees (and chair of some of them), it should promote the implementation of clear listing and delisting criteria in every single case.

Vetting troop contributing countries

Hardly anything is as damaging to the reputation of UN peace operations as incidents of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA), as well as a lack of readiness to act decisively to protect civilians  at risk in their vicinity. Secretary-General António Guterres has already introduced important reforms in this area. Yet, German Ambassador Christoph Heusgen, when asked about his plans to tackle the issue in the Security Council at a recent event in New York , could only think of the inclusion of more women in troop contingents. However, a more stringent and systematic vetting of all troop contingents regarding their previous human rights records in domestic settings, would be more important in this context. The deployment of 49 non-vetted Sri Lankan soldiers in Lebanon this year demonstrated that the current UN procedures are not sufficient.

Using its increased credibility as troop contributor in Mali, Germany should promote stronger accountability of all troop contributing countries. Based on an existing Security Council resolution, the UN secretary-general should ban states that do not sufficiently investigate allegations of sexual exploitations and abuse against their soldiers from future missions until they improve their procedures. Similarly, performance assessments of troop contingents, such as the ones requested by the Security Council for the UN Mission in South Sudan after a special review, should also be conducted for  all other missions.

Make visiting missions more flexible and geared towards crisis management

German diplomats like to point out that they would prioritize conflict prevention in the Security Council. Rarely do they go into the details of the Council’s added value in political crises – and where it might be counterproductive. One important instrument for early crisis management are visiting missions of Security Council diplomats. Under the leadership of up to three members, representatives of all 15 member states fly to a region to talk to the relevant actors on the ground.

Germany should prepare and lead such a mission if the opportunity presents itself. Potential destinations could be Sudan or South Sudan, where Germany has supported dialogue and mediation processes. At the same time, Germany should strive for more flexible mission formats, which could deploy a small delegation of the Security Council and key UN officials more quickly.

Stand up for peace and prevention

A stronger focus on the promotion of peace and transition processes in the Security Council will meet resistance. China, Russia, and a number of member states from the Global South are quick to refer to state sovereignty in the context of international mediation efforts in authoritarian states. The Trump administration in the United States undermines diplomatic processes on Iran and Syria and moves to cut the budget of UN peace operations even in places where violence and conflict are on the rise as in the Democratic Republic of Congo. As former colonial powers, the UK and France hold back on Cameroon, while the conflict about the Anglophone areas is escalating.

With its ambition to promote peace and conflict prevention, Germany must not shy away from conflicts in the Security Council. At the same time, it should rely on stable partnerships and frequent exchange with its European partners as well as countries like South Africa. The latter will also be a member of the Security Council from 2019 and started pursueing more multilateral solutions under President Cyril Ramophosa.

At the end of its membership in the Council, the German government should order an independent evaluation of its diplomacy around the horseshoe table. The objective: learning lessons for its next candidacy to join the playing field of major powers.

Diplomaten an die Front! Krisenprävention braucht das richtige Personal

Die Bundesregierung braucht mehr Diplomaten in Krisenländern. In krisengeschüttelten Staaten kommt diesen eine Schlüsselrolle zu, um die häufig beklagte Lücke zwischen Frühwarnung und entschiedenem Handeln zu überbrücken. Das deutsche Botschaftspersonal braucht eine bessere Vorbereitung, zusätzliche Ressourcen und ein offenes Ohr in der Zentrale.

This post appeared on the PeaceLab2016 Blog.

Innerstaatliche Krisen entstehen in der Regel vor Ort, zwischen polarisierten Eliten einer Gesellschaft oder als Folge einer marginalisierten Opposition. Lange bevor Entscheidungen des Bundestags über den Einsatz militärischer Mittel anstehen, verdichten sich Zeichen, dass unterdrückte Gruppen Frustration anstauen oder scheinbar stabile Systeme vom Wohl und Wehe autoritärer Herrscher abhängig sind. Neben der eher langfristig angelegten Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, welche konsequent konfliktentschärfend ausgerichtet sein sollte, ist der politische Dialog das Kerngeschäft von Diplomaten.

Gute Diplomaten können die Lücke zwischen Warnung und Reaktion schließen

Eine zentrale Herausforderung in der Krisenprävention ist die häufig identifizierte Lücke zwischen Warnung und einer entschiedenen Reaktion. Dabei greifen die Forderungen wie die von Simon Adams auf diesem Blog zu kurz, die lediglich einen stärkeren „politischen Willen“ einfordern und sich auf normative oder historische Gründe berufen, aus denen Deutschland sich stärker engagierten sollte. Die politischen Zielkonflikte um finanzielle und politische Ressourcen sind real, wie Philipp Rotmann in seinem PeaceLab2016-Beitrag feststellt. Hochrangige Besuche des Außenministers oder Anrufe der Kanzlerin bei Staatschefs, die sich gegen die Aufarbeitung von Menschenrechtsverletzungen wehren, müssen abgewogen werden gegenüber dem Einsatz in bereits lodernden Krisenfeuern oder zu innenpolitisch wichtigeren Themen. Investitionen in Krisenprävention sind hochgradig unsicher. Zudem laufen sie Gefahr, die bilateralen Beziehungen mit der jeweiligen Regierung oder involvierten Nachbarstaaten zu beeinträchtigen.

Frühwarnung ist ein Überzeugungsprozess innerhalb der bürokratischen Maschinerie. Hier kann es leicht zu organisatorischen Engpässen kommen, bevor die politische Leitung weiteren Maßnahmen zustimmt. Die Steuerung von politischen Prozessen tausende Kilometer entfernt von der eigenen Hauptstadt ist nicht allein über Anweisungen und politische Stellungnahmen möglich. Ein größerer operativer Spielraum für Diplomaten in Krisenländern ist daher eine zentrale Voraussetzung für ein aktives Krisenengagement.

Aktiv einmischen und Netzwerke nutzen

Krisenerprobte Diplomaten können auf Erfahrungen in anderen Ländern zurückgreifen und Gelegenheiten erkennen, Eskalationsspiralen umzukehren und die handelnden Akteure zu einer konstruktiven Streitbeilegung zu ermutigen. Sie können die Regierung oder Oppositionsgruppen mit Nichtregierungsorganisationen in Verbindung setzen, sich mit Konfliktparteien ohne größere politische Aufmerksamkeit treffen und, theoretisch zumindest, dabei mit dem notwendigen Taktgefühl hantieren. Im Gegensatz zu nichtstaatlichen Organisationen verfügen sie mitunter über erhebliches politisches Gewicht und können mit staatlichen Akteuren auf gleicher Ebene verhandeln.

Präventiv tätig zu sein bedeutet jedoch, sich in laufende politische Auseinandersetzungen des betreffenden Landes einzumischen. Hier ist Bedachtsamkeit unabdingbar, um den Konflikt nicht zu verschärfen. Diplomaten werden passende Gelegenheiten, sich einzumischen, nur erkennen und erhalten, wenn sie bereits zu „normalen“ Zeiten ein weites Netz an Kontakten unterhalten, das über die der Regierung nahe stehenden Eliten hinausgeht. Belastbare Beziehungen zahlen sich gerade in Krisenzeiten aus.

Das Botschaftspersonal muss dem sich selbst bestätigenden Kreis von Diplomaten, Unternehmern, Journalisten und Regierungsmitarbeitern regelmäßig entfliehen, um festgefahrene Vorurteile über die politische Dynamik eines Landes aufzubrechen. So waren viele westliche Botschaften während des Umsturzes in Ägypten Anfang 2011 überrascht, dass die Mehrheit der Demonstranten keine Islamisten waren. Die Regierung hatte lange genug davon gesprochen, dass die einzige Alternative zur Herrschaft Mubaraks die Muslimbruderschaft sei.

Auslandsvertretungen brauchen mehr und besser ausgebildetes Personal

Das Auswärtige Amt muss Maßnahmen treffen, um die Auslandsvertretungen zu stärken. Dazu gehört ganz grundsätzlich, Krisenposten ernster zu nehmen und mit ausreichend dauerhaftem Personal auszustatten. Zum Beispiel arbeiten viel zu wenige deutsche Diplomaten vor Ort oder in den Nachbarländern im Irak oder zu Syrien. Darüber hinaus sollten die Leitlinien drei Bereiche stärken: Vorbereitung, Ressourcenbereitstellung und Organisationskultur.

Angehende deutsche Diplomaten genießen eine ausführliche Ausbildung zu Beginn ihrer Karriere. Ein Jahr lang pauken sie am Tegeler See Völkerrecht, volkswirtschaftliche Grundlagen, Konsularrecht, Umgang mit der Presse und Sprachen. Doch krisenrelevante Fähigkeiten kommen häufig zu kurz. Erst dieses Jahr führte das Auswärtige Amt ein Mediationstraining für die Attachés (und ein separates Training für erfahrene Diplomaten) ein. Die Postenvorbereitung wird zu großen Teilen den Betroffenen selbst überlassen. Gespräche mit Länderreferenten und den Vorgängern sind richtig, aber Sprachkenntnisse kommen häufig zu kurz. Kein deutscher Diplomat, keine deutsche Diplomatin sollte in ein arabisches Land geschickt werden ohne zumindest Grundkenntnisse der Sprache zu besitzen.

In vielen Staaten, in denen innerstaatliche Konflikte drohen, verfügt Deutschland nur über kleine oder gar keine Vertretungen (mehr). In größeren Staaten nehmen die sonstigen Beziehungen einen großen Teil der Arbeit ein. Daher ist es wichtig, Auslandsvertretungen im Zweifel mit schnell verfügbaren Ressourcen zu unterstützen:

  • der Bereitstellung von Expertise und Ausarbeitungen, die über die Kapazitäten eines einzelnen Länderreferenten, der vielleicht noch für mehre Länder gleichzeitig zuständig ist, hinausgehen;
  • wenn nötig auch der Entsendung von zusätzlichen Mitarbeitern, die gegebenenfalls besondere Fähigkeiten wie Konfliktanalyse oder Mediation abdecken können, oder einfach die Botschaftsleitung entlasten können bei Koordinationstreffen mit anderen internationalen Partnern.

Kleinstprojekte, über deren Vergabe die Botschaften selbst entscheiden können, sind ein weiteres Mittel mit dem Auslandsvertretungen direkt konfliktvermindernde Projekte durchführen können. Die Auswahl der Projekte sollte sich jedoch nicht allein danach richten, welche Organisation die meisten Schlüsselwörter in ihrem Antrag verwendet oder wo man eine Plakette draufkleben kann.

Zuletzt ist eine aktivere diplomatische Präventionsarbeit nicht allein eine Frage der ausreichenden Vorbereitung und materiellen Ausstattung, sondern eine Sache der grundlegenden Einstellung der Diplomaten. Die Leitlinien oder länderspezifische Weisungen der Zentrale können nicht jeden Einzelfall regeln; sie bleiben notwendigerweise abstrakt. Staatssekretäre und Abteilungsleiter sollten eine Organisationskultur fördern, die internen Austausch über Hierarchien und Abteilungen hinweg belohnt, konstruktiv-kritische Berichte ernstnimmt und Eigeninitiative der Auslandsvertretungen gerade im Bereich Krisenprävention anregt. Der Review2014 Prozess hat hier bereits die richtigen Weichen gestellt. Nun gilt es sicherzustellen, dass dieser Wandel auch an den Botschaften umgesetzt wird.

Immer wieder den eigenen Ansatz hinterfragen

Eine aktive diplomatische Rolle in innerstaatlichen Konflikten läuft stets Gefahr, Krisen zu verschärfen, oder doch zumindest zu neuen Problemen zu führen. Zu häufig ist internationales Engagement gekennzeichnet von Stereotypen, Vorurteilen und Templates, obwohl sich Geber weltweit vorgenommen haben, „local ownership“ zu priorisieren. Den eigenen Ansatz regelmäßig zu hinterfragen und Ortskräfte auch in strategische Überlegungen einzubeziehen ist ein wichtiger Anfang – wie auch Cornelia Brinkmann in ihrem PeaceLab2016-Beitrag argumentierte. Am Ende gilt: auch wenn die Einflussmöglichkeiten deutscher Diplomatie begrenzt sind, sollten Diplomaten ihren Spielraum ausschöpfen. Sonst bleiben die hehren Ziele der Leitlinien nur Papier.

Kein Frieden ohne Aufarbeitung   

Die Bundesregierung sollte sich für eine unabhängige gerichtliche Aufarbeitung des Bürgerkriegs in Sri Lanka einsetzen.

Diese Woche besucht der sri lankische Präsident Maithripala Sirisena Berlin. Als er vor dreizehn Monaten sein Amt antrat, begleiteten ihn große Hoffnungen auf demokratische Erneuerung, die Aufarbeitung von Kriegsverbrechen aus dem Bürgerkrieg und ein erneuertes Verhältnis zu internationalen Institutionen. Während eine neue Verfassung ausgearbeitet wird und die sri lankische Regierung gerade den Hochkommissar der Vereinten Nationen für Menschenrechte zu Gast hatte, ruderte die Regierung in den letzten Wochen beim Thema Aufarbeitung zurück. Die Bundesregierung sollte auf ihr traditionell gutes Verhältnis zu Sri Lanka bauen und sich bei Präsident Sirisena für eine substantielle internationale Rolle bei der juristischen Aufarbeitung mutmaßlicher Kriegsverbrechen einsetzen.

Teil der politischen Agenda der großen Koalition unter Präsident Sirisena und Premierminister Ranil Wickremasinghe ist seit Amtsantritt ein konstruktiverer Umgang mit der tamilischen Minderheit. Dazu gehört ein grundsätzliches Bekenntnis zur Aufarbeitung von schwerwiegenden Menschenrechtsverletzungen während des sechsundzwanzigjährigen Bürgerkriegs, der im Mai 2009 mit einem militärischen Sieg der Regierung zu Ende ging. In seiner Rede zum sri lankischen Unabhängigkeitstag am 4. Februar 2016 bezeichnete Präsident Sirisena die Versöhnung zwischen den Volksgruppen Sri Lankas als zentrale Aufgabe, um wirtschaftlichen Aufschwung zu sichern und politische Stabilität zu garantieren.

Ein entscheidender Teil dieses Versöhnungsprozesses ist die Aufarbeitung vergangenen Unrechts. Zahlreiche Expertenberichte werfen sowohl den Regierungsarmee als auch den Rebellen der tamilischen Befreiungstiger (LTTE) massive Menschenrechtsverletzungen während des gesamten Bürgerkrieges vor. Insbesondere die letzten Monate des Kriegs im Frühjahr 2009 geraten dabei immer wieder in den Blickpunkt: damals waren rund 300.000 tamilische Zivilisten zwischen den Fronten gefangen. Die LTTE ließ die Zivilbevölkerung nicht fliehen und die Armee schoss mit schwerer Artillerie auf dicht besiedelte Gebiete und medizinische Einrichtungen. Wenige Monate nach Ende der Feindseligkeiten tauchten Handyvideos, Photos und Zeugenaussagen unter anderem beim britischen Sender Channel 4  auf. Dieses Material zeigt, wie Soldaten gefesselte Gefangene erschießen, und lässt auf Folter und Vergewaltigung durch die Regierungstruppen schließen.

Sirisenas Vorgänger Mahinda Rajapaksa bestritt stets die Echtheit dieses Materials und verweigerte die Zusammenarbeit mit den Vereinten Nationen beim Thema Aufarbeitung. Sirisena wird nicht müde zu betonen, dass es Rajapaksas Versagen war, nach dem Ende des Krieges die Versöhnung der sri lankischen Volksgruppen zu verfolgen, welche zunehmenden internationalen Druck für die Aufarbeitung von mutmaßlichen Kriegsverbrechen zur Folge hatte.

Im Oktober 2015 einigte sich die neue sri lankische Regierung mit den Mitgliedern des UN-Menschenrechtsrats auf einen umfassenden Maßnahmenkatalog zur Versöhnung, Wiedergutmachung und Aufarbeitung mutmaßlicher Kriegsverbrechen. Nach zähen Verhandlungen unter Federführung von Großbritannien und den USA stimmten die sri lankischen Verhandlungsführer zu, dass Sri Lanka einen Sondergerichtshof zu diesem Zweck einrichten solle, welcher „Commonwealth und andere ausländische Richter“ beteiligt.

Die genaue Rolle von internationalen Juristen in diesem, noch einzurichtenden Sondergerichtshof bleibt jedoch weiterhin hochumstritten. Während Tamilenverbände und Vertretungen von Folteropfern sich für eine mehrheitlich internationale Besetzung der Richterbank aussprechen, lehnt die sri lankische Regierung jegliche internationale operative Rolle von internationalen Richtern ab; lediglich „technische“ Beratung unter dem Dach des Hochkommissars für Menschenrechte sei denkbar. In einem BBC-Interview im Januar 2016 lehnte Sirisena die Beteiligung internationaler Richter ab und zeigte eine beunruhigende Gelassenheit, wann der Gerichtshof überhaupt eingesetzt werde.

Diese Einstellung widerspricht der eigenen Verpflichtung zur Versöhnung. Über Jahrzehnte haben sri lankische Gerichte Verletzungen der Streitkräfte nicht oder nur unzureichend aufgeklärt. Stattdessen wurden Zeugen unter Druck gesetzt, Beweismittel vernichtet und Prozesse nach staatlichem Druck ausgesetzt, wie ein UN-Bericht letztes Jahr beobachtete. Im Oktober letzten Jahres stellte eine noch von Rajapaksa eingesetzte Expertenkommission unter Vorsitz des sri lankischen Richters Maxwell Paranagama fest, dass das sri lankische Justizsystem nur dann in der Lage wäre, diese Verbrechen zu verfolgen, wenn es die bestehenden internationalen Standards ins Strafgesetzbuch aufnehme, insbesondere zur Befehlshaberverantwortlichkeit. Sogar aus Sicht der regierungstreuen Kommission sei eine Beteiligung von Commonwealth Richtern wünschenswert.

Kanzlerin Merkel kann also auf die Empfehlungen einer einheimischen Kommission verweisen, wenn sie Präsident Sirisena auf die Umsetzung der UN-Resolution anspricht. Weiterhin sollte sie deutlich machen, dass die Resolution des Menschenrechtsrats, welche dieser unter deutschem Vorsitz beschloss, eine gemeinsame Verpflichtung der sri lankischen Regierung und der Ratsmitglieder darstellt. Wenige Tage nach Sirisenas umstrittenen Äußerungen zeigte sich Premierminister Wickremasinghe im britischen Fernsehen offen gegenüber einer Beteiligung internationaler Juristen und einer möglichen Anklage Rajapaksas.

Wie wir in Deutschland nur zu gut wissen, dauert die Aufarbeitung vergangenen Unrechts lange und muss viele strukturelle Hindernisse überwinden. Dies ist auch in Sri Lanka der Fall. Sirisena steht unter Druck des nationalistischen Lagers in seiner eigenen Partei, das sich um den früheren Präsidenten Rajapsaka schart. Doch deren Lautstärke sollte nicht darüber hinweg täuschen, dass die große Koalition der Regierung über eine breite Mehrheit verfügt. Der momentane Verfassungsreformprozess bietet eine gute Gelegenheit, die legalen Voraussetzungen für die Beteiligung internationaler Richter zum Beispiel in einer Sonderkammer des obersten Strafgerichts Sri Lankas zu schaffen.

Freilich kann eine gerichtliche Aufarbeitung allein nicht die Versöhnung der sri lankischen Volksgruppen garantieren. Weitere Maßnahmen wie die Entmilitarisierung des Nordens und Ostens der Insel, eine Dezentralisierung der Verwaltung und die Identifikation der in der Haft gestorbenen Tamilen können zu einem ganzheitlichen Prozess beitragen. Ohne Frage muss dieser Prozess auch auf das Leid der Singhalesen durch terroristische Anschläge der LTTE eingehen. Die Beteiligung unabhängiger internationaler Experten an der gerichtlichen Aufarbeitung würde diesem ganzheitlichen Verständnis von Versöhnung dienen.