The UN at 70: Diplomacy as the art of the possible

17425965295_74bfed04fe_o.jpg

Photo (c) UN Photo.

This post first appeared on the Blog Junge UN-Forschung.

These days, people all over the world commemorate the founding of the United Nations 70 years ago. On 24 October 1945, the UN Charter entered into force and a new international organization was born out of the ashes of the Second World War and the Holocaust. Today, commemorating the UN is often an occasion to question its continuing relevance, and stress the need for its wholesale reform. Even UN enthusiasts are resigned; the best argument put forward is usually along the lines: there is no alternative to this universal international organization that provides a forum for world leaders, an authority on international norms, and a lifeline for millions affected by conflict, poverty, and disease.

The atmosphere was decidedly more upbeat at the recent commemorative event organized by the United Nations Association UK (UNA-UK), the civil society organization in the United Kingdom devoted to the United Nations. Bringing together around 1,000 guests in the medieval Guildhall in central London, the discussions and keynote speech underlined the nature of multilateral diplomacy. It is the art of the possible and often up to individuals, exploring the opportunities that lie in “the space between where your instructions end and you as a thinking negotiator invest your own thought”, High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein said once to The New York Times. His remarks at the event reflected this insight, just as much as the thorough recommendations from Gro Harlem Brundtland, former Prime Minister of Norway, and Hina Jilani, Pakistani Supreme Court Advocate in the panel discussion preceding the High Commissioner’s keynote. Both are members of The Elders, an advocacy organization on peace and human rights founded by Nelson Mandela.

Holding such an event in London had a particular historic significance: Just a few miles from Guildhall, the UN General Assembly met for the first time on 10 January 1946 in Westminster Methodist Central Hall. The UN Security Council followed a week later, with a meeting in Church House in Westminster, London.

More transparency for the Secretary General’s election and the use of the veto

Seventy years later, everyone agrees that the UN needs reform, but opinions diverge how that can be achieved. Three examples highlight areas where consistent advocacy and careful negotiations can advance the overall effectiveness and legitimacy of the United Nations and its work: electing the new Secretary General, the use of the veto in the Security Council, and transitional justice in Sri Lanka.

At the end of next year, the UN will choose a new Secretary-General, as Ban Ki-moon’s second term comes to an end. Traditionally, the five permanent members of the Security Council have decided on the final candidate just by themselves, without public debate, campaigns, or any meaningful inclusion of the General Assembly which could only confirm the lowest common denominator candidate the five powers could agree on. Improving this process is important, as Gro Harlem Brundtland outlined, as the Secretary General can prove an influential normative leader. To be able to work for the world community, he (or she!) needs to be independent and impartial, and all countries need to have the feeling that the Secretary General represents their common interest.

For this purpose, UNA-UK started the 1for7billion campaign. Its objective is to make the selection process of the Secretary General more transparent, including encouraging member states to suggest candidates that would run on an open platform, spelling out official criteria for the selection, informal meetings with the candidates by the General Assembly, and encouraging a female candidate.

Unrealistic? Requires a charter change? Actually, on 11 September 2015, the General Assembly adopted a resolution outlining all of the above principles. Activists, including The Elder member Brundtland, would like to see further changes such as limiting the term of the SG to one, non-renewable seven-year term, and the actual submission of more than once candidate by the Security Council to the General Assembly. Still, the 1for7billion campaign is a primary example how a civil society-led campaign can push the boundaries of multilateral diplomacy further.

The issue of restraining permanent members from using their veto in the Security Council is a tougher nut to crack. The French government, as well as a group of member states called the “Accountability, Coherence and Transparency Group” (ACT) have assembled 73 member states behind their pledge not to use the veto in case of mass atrocities. Recently, the UK joined the French in signing up to the code of conduct for the permanent members, leaving the US, Russia, and China, which have all declared their opposition to the proposal. Here, The Elders member Jilani advocated that permanent members should at least be required to explain their position publicly, if they do decide to resort to the veto. This explanation could then provide the basis for further deliberation – and further pressure to find an agreeable solution.

Transitional justice in Sri Lanka

Lastly, High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid delivered a passionate plea for the value of human rights in our time: refugees crossing a border illegally should not be regarded as criminals, he said. More than any other high-level official in the UN system, his office confronts him with evidence of the worst offences against ordinary human beings on a daily basis. Recounting a recent visit to Mexico, where he met with families of some of the 26,000 persons that have disappeared in recent years, he vented his frustration and despair: “It leaves you feeling empty”, he said. Still, “if we did nothing, the situation would have no chance of getting better”, he added defiantly.

Transitional justice in Sri Lanka is a recent example what a careful diplomatic approach can accomplish. On 1 October, the UN Human Rights Council adopted a resolution, in congruence with the Sri Lankan government, recommending a host of measures designed to advance the process of reconciliation, accountability and non-recurrence more than six years after the end of the brutal civil war in the island nation. One particularly hard-fought issue was the inclusion of international judges in the judicial mechanism to investigate crimes and try perpetrators for international crimes.

Despite its general openness to work with international partners on reconciliation and accountability, the new Sri Lankan government had promised its electorate at home that alleged perpetrators would only be tried by domestic judges. For the high commissioner, as well as the UK and the US as main sponsors of the resolution, the decades-long history of delayed and flawed trials for human rights abuses in Sri Lanka meant that some international element was going to be crucial to make the mechanism meaningful. After hurried last-minute negotiations, the Sri Lankan diplomats finally agreed to the “participation of… Commonwealth and other foreign judges” in the Sri Lankan mechanism.

As Sir Jeremy Greenstock, chairman of UNA-UK, asked the High Commissioner whether he believed that this was actually enough, the latter pointed out that the Human Rights Council adopted his recommendations “almost in total” and that there was “immense legal expertise” in Sri Lanka. He is due to travel to the country until the end of the year to further clarify the implementation of the resolution.

Public consultations for the election of the new Secretary General, a code of conduct for Security Council action in situations of mass atrocities, and redress for massive human rights violations during Sri Lanka’s civil war: three recent examples how diplomacy, pushed by strong civil society advocacy, can make a difference at the United Nations. In a time where public debate is dominated by the failures of UN member states in Syria and Ukraine, as well as of UN staff in the Central African Republic or Darfur, it is important to highlight the role of individuals and their actions in international crises. Given a window of opportunity, individual diplomats, senior UN officials and civil society activists can meaningfully contribute to make the vision of the UN Charter a living reality, bit by bit.

EINE “KULTUR DER WAHRHEIT”?

Chancen und Grenzen des neuen Wissenschaftlichen Beirats des UN-Generalsekretärs

This blog post first appeared on the Bretterblog.

Vorstellung des Wissenschaftlichen Beirats im Auswärtigen Amt, (c) photothek/Gottschalk
Vorstellung des Wissenschaftlichen Beirats im Auswärtigen Amt, (c) photothek/Gottschalk

Die Vereinten Nationen bewegen sich auf ein Jahr der Weichenstellungen hin. 2015 sollen unter anderem die Nachfolgeziele der Millenniumentwicklungsziele (MDGs) von einem Sondergipfel im September verabschiedet werden; die UN-Generalversammlung will einen erneuten Versuch wagen, den Sicherheitsrat – nun aber wirklich – zu reformieren und in Paris soll ein rechtlich verbindliches Abkommen zur Bewältigung des globalen Klimawandels verabschiedet werden.

Angesichts dieser Agenda kann der UN-Generalsekretär jede Unterstützung gebrauchen. Zur wissenschaftlichen Flankierung des politischen Ringens um tragfähige Kompromisse hat Ban Ki-Moon einen Wissenschaftlichen Beirat (Scientific Advisory Board, SAB) ins Leben gerufen. Diesem gehören 26 namhafte Wissenschaftler_innen aus der ganzen Welt an. Der Beirat, der auf eineEmpfehlung des Panels for Global Sustainability (unter Vorsitz der Präsidenten Finnlands und Südafrika) zurückgeht, feierte am Donnerstag, 30.01.2014, seine konstituierende Sitzung im Auswärtigen Amt in Berlin.

Aufgaben und Relevanz noch zu klären

Die genauen Aufgaben des „höchsten Wissenschaftsgremiums der Welt“ (Spiegel Online) sind allerdings noch recht vage gehalten. Grundsätzlich soll es den Generalsekretär und die anderen Leiter von UN-Organisationen in Wissenschaftsfragen beraten. Thematisch soll es sich schwerpunktmäßig mit nachhaltiger Entwicklung beschäftigen und dabei in der Tat den Post-MDG-Prozess unterstützen, dessen Bedeutung Ban in seiner Rede in Berlin unterstrich.

Ob es dem Beirat dabei gelingt, die Rolle von wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen in den Entscheidungsfindungsprozessen der Vereinten Nationen zu erhöhen, wie die offizielle Aufgabenbeschreibung formuliert, bleibt noch abzuwarten. Das Gremium trifft sich zweimal im Jahr und bestimmt seine genaue Agenda (neben der Bearbeitung konkreter Aufträge des Generalsekretärs) selbst. In welcher Form es sich dann äußert – Berichte, Stellungnahmen oder Analysen – muss es erst noch entscheiden. Impulse zu aktuellen Entwicklungen sind so nur sehr bedingt möglich, zudem es bislang keine_n Leiter_in oder Untergremien gibt. Immerhin stellt die UNESCO als wichtigste mit Wissenschaft befasste Sonderorganisation dem Beirat ein Sekretariat zur Verfügung.

Der Beirat muss also seine eigene Relevanz noch unter Beweis stellen. Gerade im Bereich Nachhaltigkeit haben die Vereinten Nationen hochrangige und erfolgreiche Wissenschaftsgremien, welche die aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Ergebnisse zum Klimawandel (IPCC) und biologischer Vielfalt (IPBES) zusammenstellen und in die jeweiligen politischen Entscheidungsgremien hineintragen. Nicht zufällig sind die beiden Leiter dieser Gremien auch Mitglieder im SAB. Dazu wird der Prozess der Millenniumsentwicklungsziele von einem weiten Spektrum von regelmäßigen Indikatoren und Berichten begleitet, welches die globale Diskussion um Armutsbekämpfung und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit auf eine neue Ebene gehoben hat.

Diese Tiefe kann und soll der Beirat nicht erreichen. Ihm geht es vielmehr um einen „holistischen“ Ansatz, wie Ban in Berlin unterstrich. Anstatt einen Forschungsstand aufzuarbeiten soll das SAB das „verstreute Wissen“, so UNESCO-Generaldirektorin Bokova, zusammenbringen und in eine politikverständliche Sprache verpacken. Daher sind die im Beirat vertretenen Disziplinen recht vielfältig. Neben Biologen, Chemikern und Physikern finden sich dort auch eine Politikwissenschaftlerin (Maria Ivanoya aus Bulgarien, die in den USA lehrt) und ein Historiker (Sir Hilary Beckles aus Barbados). Für Innovation soll dabei auch Hayat Sindi sorgen, die in Jedda (Saudi-Arabien) ein „Institut für Vorstellungskraft und Einfallsreichtum“ leitet (dahinter verbirgt sich vor allem die Förderung sozialen Unternehmertums). Aus Deutschland sitzt der Mikrobiologe Jörg Hacker im Beirat, Vorsitzender der Leopoldina, der Deutschen Akademie für Naturforscher in Halle.

SAB Banner

Wissenschaft ist stets umkämpft

Es klingt in der Tat bestechend. Wissenschaftlich gesicherte Erkenntnisse sollten stets die Grundlage vernünftiger Politik sein. Moderator Ranga Yogeshwar ging noch einen Schritt weiter und fragte, ob nicht die in der Wissenschaft vorherrschende „Kultur der Wahrheit, nach der wir Wissenschaftler alle streben“ auch richtungsweisend für die häufig zerstrittene Politik sein könne.

Eine Wahrheit als Ziel der Wissenschaft oder gar der Politik? Hier taten sich doch Abgründe auf. Wissenschaft lebt von der kontroversen Diskussion. Die meisten Erkenntnisse, sowohl in Natur- als auch in Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften, sind eben nicht wie das Gesetz der Schwerkraft, das Yogeshwar als Beispiel nannte. Es ist eine der wichtigsten Aufgaben der wissenschaftlichen Gemeinschaft, Forschungsergebnisse zu überprüfen und immer wieder kritisch zu hinterfragen. Nicht zuletzt die öffentliche Auseinandersetzung mit dem Weltklimarat IPCC hat die Bedeutung und politische Relevanz von Szenarien, die verschiedene mögliche Entwicklungen basierend auf unterschiedlichen Annahmen durchrechnen, gezeigt. Wissenschaft kann (wenn überhaupt) nur Wahrscheinlichkeiten bestimmen.

Selbst etablierte Wissenschaftler machen Fehler, mit teilweise fataler Wirkung. Der IPCC gab eine falsche Prognose für die Gletscherschmelze im Himalaya heraus, die nur auf einem Interview und nicht auf erhobenen Daten basierte. Zwei Harvard-Ökonomen machten Fehler in einer Excel Tabelle und kamen so zu dem Schluss, Länder mit einer hohen Staatsschuldenquote hätten stets ein niedrigeres Wachstum zu erwarten –  in der Finanzkrise müssten Regierungen also möglichst stark auf einen Sparkurs setzen im Vergleich zu schuldenfinanzierten (keynesianischen) Konjunkturpaketen.

Daher ist also Vorsicht geboten vor der Vorstellung, Politik könne nur eine Sachentscheidung auf der Basis wissenschaftlicher Fakten sein. Insbesondere wenn es um politische Handlungsempfehlungen geht, sind stets Wertentscheidungen mit von der Partie. Welche Kosten z.B. bei der Bewältigung des Klimawandels sollen zukünftige Generationen tragen, welche sind kurzfristig vermittelbar? Wie bewerten wir den unsicheren zukünftigen Nutzen aus noch unentdeckten Pflanzenarten in einem Naturschutzgebiet (also den Erhalt biologischer Vielfalt) gegenüber einer Industriepolitik, die mit zur Armutsbekämpfung beitragen kann? Gute (und transparente) Kommunikation, so IPCC-Vorsitzender Pachauri, ist also ganz entscheidend. Dies gilt gerade auch für die auch wissenschaftlichen Empfehlungen zu Grunde liegenden Wertentscheidungen.

Gelegenheit der Vernetzung und Impulssetzung

Auf diese Fragen wies auch die sechsköpfige Gruppe „junger Wissenschaftler“ hin, die zum Abschluss ein eigenes Statement verlasen. Als jemand, der sich für die Vernetzung von Nachwuchswissenschaftler_innen im Bereich Vereinten Nationen einsetzt, freute es mich natürlich ganz besonders, dass junge Wissenschaftler zu Wort kamen (auch wenn nicht klar war, wie diese ausgewählt worden waren). Ganz gleich, welche Entscheidungen ihr trefft und welche Empfehlungen ihr gebt, so die Botschaft, „wir werden die Konsequenzen erben.“

Die privilegierte Position eines Wissenschaftlichen Beirats des UN-Generalsekretärs bringt somit auch eine nicht unerhebliche Verantwortung mit sich. Neben seiner eigentlichen Beratungsfunktion kann der Beirat also möglicherweise auch einige Impulse für die Wissenschaftspolitik setzen. Wissenschaft auf der ganzen Welt inklusiver gestalten und das Gespräch mit der Öffentlichkeit suchen, sei so eine Aufgabe, forderten die jungen Wissenschaftler. Daten und Ergebnisse müssten für alle frei zugänglich sein und Wissen transparent gemacht werden.

Um dies leisten zu können, müsste der Beirat jedoch eine vernehmbare Stimme erhalten. Dazu müsste er auch mit anderen Organen der Vereinten Nationen, insbesondere der Generalversammlung und ihrem Präsidenten, zusammen arbeiten können. Er sollte nicht nur für den Generalsekretär, sondern auch für die Mitgliedstaaten bereit stehen und sich zu spezifischen Fragen im Rahmen des Post-MDG-Prozesses äußern können. Wenn dies gelingt, könnte er durch die Art und Weise seiner „ganzheitlichen“ Beratung einen kritischen, offenen Umgang mit wissenschaftlichen Ergebnissen weltweit einfordern und somit als Multiplikator und Vorbild für die internationale Zusammenarbeit zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik dienen.

“Für eine faire Partnerschaft” – der deutsche Beitrag zur UN-Friedenssicherung

UNIFIL field
UNIFIL German peacekeeper on the ship- May 3 2007 UNIFIL photo Jorge Aramburu

(c) UN Photo/Jorge Aramburu

Der Beitrag erschien zuerst auf dem Blog Junge UN-Forschung.

Deutsche Außenpolitik, betonen Entscheidungsträger gern, sei „Friedenspolitik“– so auch Außenminister Westerwelle bei dem Festakt zur 40jährigen Mitgliedschaft Deutschlands in den Vereinten Nationen. In diesem Sinne setzte er sich auch vehement für eine Reform des UN-Sicherheitsrats und einen ständigen deutschen Sitz ein, zuletzt bei seiner jüngsten Rede während der UN Generaldebatte in New York. Der deutsche Beitrag zur UN-Friedenssicherung gilt dabei beständig als wichtige Rechtfertigung für diesen Anspruch.

Demgegenüber wurde Deutschland bei der Podiumsdiskussion zu diesem Thema bei der DGVN-Fachtagung ein eher schlechtes Zeugnis ausgestellt. Die Diskussion konzentrierte sich insbesondere auf das fundamentale Ungleichgewicht zwischen der Bereitstellung von Finanzmitteln und Personal durch Deutschland. Während Deutschland 7,14% zum aktuellen Haushalt für Friedenseinsätze beiträgt (ca. 538 Mio. US-Dollar, Platz 4), trägt es lediglich 0,26% zum Personal bei (251 Polizisten, Militärexperten und Soldaten, Platz 41). Während die aktuelle Arbeitsteilung zwischen Ländern des globalen Südens (Personal) und OECD-Ländern (Finanzmittel) in der Tat problematisch ist, verfehlte die Diskussion jedoch andere wichtige Aspekte von Prävention, Diplomatie und Analyse ausreichend anzusprechen, bei denen Deutschland leichter einen größeren Beitrag zur UN-Friedenssicherung leisten könnte.

Lernerfolg und weiterer Nachholbedarf bei den Vereinten Nationen

Dass manches Problem nicht angesprochen wurde, lag sicher nicht an dem Input-Referat von Thorsten Benner, Direktor des Global Public Policy Institutes in Berlin (wo ich auch arbeite, full disclosure), in dem er die aktuelle Situation und wichtige Herausforderungen in der UN-Friedenssicherung breit und präzise herausarbeitete. Benner strukturierte seinen Vortrag anhand von drei zentralen Thesen.

Erstens habe die UN wichtige Lehren seit dem Brahimi-Bericht vor dreizehn Jahren gezogen. Missionen werden langfristiger angesetzt, das Sekretariat sei besser und professioneller aufgestellt, Einsätze sind „robuster“ und haben häufiger den Schutz von Zivilisten im Fokus. Regionale Kooperationen spielen zunehmend eine größere Rolle, z.B. in Somalia oder Darfur.

Die höheren Anforderungen an Friedensmissionen führten jedoch zweitens zu einem erheblichen Nachholbedarf in einigen Bereichen. Mangelhaft ist die Bereitstellung von Transport- und Logistikkapazitäten, Fähigkeiten zur Aufklärung, auch durch Drohnen und Satellitenbilder. Das Personalwesen bietet häufig keine ausreichenden Karriereanreize für einzelne „Friedenssicherer“. Ein weiteres Problem machte Benner bei den Sondergesandten des Generalsekretärs aus, welche gleichzeitig diplomatisch erfahrene als auch politisch scharfsinnige Persönlichkeiten sein müssen, diesen Anspruch aber nicht immer einlösen könnten. Zuletzt seien der Bereich der Krisenprävention und das bereits angesprochene Ungleichgewicht der Truppensteller  nicht zufriedenstellend.

Letztlich könnten mehr Kapazitäten und bessere Technologien jedoch auch nicht die großen politischen Spannungen bei der Friedenssicherung lösen, so Benners dritte These. Beim Institutionenaufbau sei die internationale Gemeinschaft auf nationale Eliten angewiesen, die Vereinbarungen tatsächlich und glaubwürdig umsetzen können. Wie das Beispiel der DR Kongo zeigt, sind diese jedoch häufig selbst an massiven Menschenrechtsverletzungen beteiligt. Die lokalen Begründungen für Gewaltanwendungen im Bürgerkrieg, die oft im Zusammenhang mit Themen wie Landansprüchen, Ressourcenverteilung oder Mitspracherechten stehen, bilden häufig einen Kontrast zur Makroebene von Gewalt und nationalen Friedensbemühungen zwischen regionalen Regierungen und den von diesen unterstützten Rebellengruppen. Alle am Konflikt beteiligten Parteien müssen in eine mögliche Lösung eingebunden werden. Dazu bedürfe es ausreichender politischer Aufmerksamkeit, um im Zweifel Druck auf die Konfliktparteien auszuüben. Hier müsse die internationale Gemeinschaft aber auch offen mit dem eigenen Versagen in einzelnen Konflikten umgehen und die begangenen Fehler aufarbeiten.

Es lohnt sich, die UN-Friedenssicherung stärker zu unterstützen

Tobias Pietz von der Analyseabteilung des Zentrums für Internationale Friedenseinsätze (ZIF) ging näher auf die Gründe für die niedrige Zahl von UN-Friedenssoldaten aus OECD-Ländern ein. Noch vor zwanzig Jahren hätten diese etwa zwei Drittel des Personals gestellt, während es jetzt weniger als 8% seien. Diese Entwicklung läge an drei wichtigen Entwicklungen: dem Trauma des Versagens in den Konflikten der 1990er Jahren (Somalia, Ruanda und Bosnien), gerade auch aus Sicht der Weltöffentlichkeit; den teuren und personalintensiven Interventionen im Irak und in Afghanistan sowie dem stärkeren Engagement für Missionen im Rahmen der europäischen Gemeinsamen Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik (dies betrifft vor allem die Polizei).

Warum ist ein stärkerer europäischer oder deutscher Beitrag zu UN-Friedensmissionen dennoch wichtig? Die Aufgabenteilung zwischen Truppenstellern und Finanziers ist zunehmendem Druck ausgeliefert, wie auch Manfred Ertl, Militärberater im Auswärtigen Amt, anerkennen musste. Ertl sah die derzeitige Arbeitsteilung bereits auf einem guten Weg zu einer „fairen Partnerschaft“, da es ja schließlich auch auf die Qualität der bereitgestellten Truppen ankäme. Während seiner Zeit im UN-Sekretariat wäre es nie ein Problem gewesen, ein Infanteriebattalion zu bekommen, allerdings hätte er schon eine Mission wegen eines fehlenden Flugleitoffiziers schließen müssen. Es wurde aber in seinen Ausführungen auch die Doppeldeutigkeit solcher Einschätzungen deutlich. Während viele große Truppenstellerstaaten eben keinem größeren öffentlichen Druck ausgesetzt seien („mit der Pressefreiheit“ sei das ja auch nicht so weit her dort, so Ertl), verlange die „Fürsorgepflicht“ des (deutschen) Staates für seine Soldaten, dass annähernd die gleichen Standards wie im Heimatland gewährleistet würden. Zu Recht verwies Benner hier auf die ebenfalls existierende (zumindest moralische) Pflicht gegenüber den Soldaten aus anderen Truppenstellerstaaten und den Bevölkerungen in den Ländern der Friedensmissionen.

Aus meiner Sicht gibt es  aber noch gewichtigere Gründe für ein erhöhtes deutsches Engagement. Die Legitimität der gesamten UN-Friedenseinsätze kann langfristig erodieren, wenn sich der Eindruck bei den Staaten Südasiens und Sub-Sahara-Afrikas festsetzt, dass sich westliche Regierungen hinter ihren finanziellen Beiträgen verstecken, während die Söhne und Töchter anderer Länder für die von ihnen im Sicherheitsrat gesetzten Ziele bereit sind zu sterben. Umgekehrt kann der politische Wille, eigene Soldaten den Vereinten Nationen bereitzustellen, ein positives Signal auch an andere Staaten senden, diesem Schritt zu folgen. Demgegenüber verweisen deutsche Entscheidungsträger gern darauf, dass sie in ihrem Wahlkreis kaum vermitteln können, warum deutsches Personal im Sudan tätig sein sollte.

Multilateralismus braucht Führungsfähigkeit, auch in Deutschland

Wenn deutsche Außenpolitik sich jedoch wirklich um Multilateralismus und Friedenssicherung sorgen möchte, sollte sie politische Führungsfähigkeit beweisen. Es genügt nicht, nur darauf zu verweisen, welche Anfragen zur Bereitstellung von Truppen für Friedensmissionen vorliegen oder auch nicht. Sogar bei der Frage des Personals könnte Deutschland eine Vorreiterrolle einnehmen. Zu ersterem schlug Benner vor, Deutschland könnte sich bereit erklären, 10% des aus Afghanistan abrückenden Personals fortan für multilaterale Missionen zur Verfügung zu stellen – immerhin gut vierhundert Soldatinnen und Soldaten. Die Bundesregierung könnte bei den europäischen Partnern für ähnliche Schritte werben. Es müsse ja auch nicht gleich die Interventionsbrigade sein, die mit überaus robustem Mandat an vorderster Front im Kongo kämpft, – Stabsoffiziere in Kinshasa können unter Umständen auch schon helfen.

Letztlich geht es jedoch um weitaus mehr als um die fast schon leidige Frage des Personals: Die politischen Rahmenbedingungen müssen stimmen. Wenn die Bundesregierung sich dazu bereit erklärt, UN-Friedensmissionen zu unterstützen, sollte dies ein Gesamtpaket sein – einschließlich erhöhtem zivilen Personal für die Mission, aber auch für die deutsche Vertretung vor Ort. Die Analysefähigkeiten für zivile Krisenprävention und Frühwarnung bei Konflikten seien in deutschen Botschaften in Sub-Sahara-Afrika häufig stark unterentwickelt, wie Benner darlegte. Das Auswärtige Amt erlaube es noch nicht einmal seinen Diplomaten, freiwillig als zivile Kräfte an UN-Friedensmissionen teilzunehmen und dabei wichtige Felderfahrung zu sammeln. Dabei legt die Bundesregierung (gleich welcher Couleur) gern wert auf die zivile Ausrichtung ihrer Außenpolitik und verweist auf Aktionsprogramm, Ressortkreis und Beirat zivile Krisenprävention. Gerade anlässlich eines Jubiläums wie dem der Mitgliedschaft Deutschlands in den Vereinten Nationen ist es Zeit, diese Versprechen mit Glaubwürdigkeit zu füllen.